Olet tässä: Etusivu » Kaupunki » What do the foreign students think about the prices of food in Vaasa?

What do the foreign students think about the prices of food in Vaasa?

webenglishThis year the prices of food in Finland have come up. Have the foreign students noticed that here in Vaasa? What do they think about the prices in Finnish stores and supermarkets?

Almost everything is more expensive than in Russia

According to Alexandra Spivakova, Russian second-year Master student in Industrial Management, she has not noticed any significant growth of the prices of food in Vaasa yet.
”During the autumn semester I was in France as an exchange student, I have just come back to Finland. So, I have not noticed any significant changes in prices yet.”
However, in her opinion, food in Finland is more expensive than in Russia anyway.
”Almost everything is more expensive here in Finland. Meat and fish in particular. But the quality of food is better.” She has some favorite stores where she generally buys food.
”Now I usually do my shopping in Lidl because the prices of food are lower there. And it is located very well – not far from Olympia where I live. When I lived in Tekla on Palosaari, I also went to the local S-Market. Location is important for me, and I prefer those shops which are nearby from my place. Sometimes I go to K-Citymarket where a choice of goods is bigger. However, I do not much shopping because I commonly have lunch in such restaurants as Mathilda or Cotton Club.”

No big difference from Japan

Ikuho Fukuman, Japanese exchange student in International Management, who came to Vaasa last semester, also has not noticed the increase of the prices. According to her, food in Finland costs almost the same as in Japan.
”For me, there is not big difference from Japan. Meat is more expensive here, vegetables are cheaper, but, on the whole, the prices are almost the same. It is good, and I think that food in Vaasa is not so expensive for me. However, my friends from other countries say that it is much more expensive to live in Finland than in their home countries.”
There are some shops in Vaasa which she prefers.
”I usually go to Minimani which is the closest to my place in Loftis. There are the best prices for me. When I am in the city center, I also go to K-Citymarket. Sometimes I go to Siwa. I also go to Asian market to buy my native food.”
She also usually has lunch in the university restaurant Mathilda.
”It is so cheap to eat there! The prices in this restaurant are much cheaper than in Japan.”

The prices have increased

As for Miguel Angel Chourio, Venezuelan second-year Master student in Telecommunication Engineering, he has already noticed the growth of the prices.
”I have recently noticed the increase of the prices, not only for food but also for the services. For instance, my rental agency announced two euro increment in the price for water services. The cost of tomatoes, bananas and other foods has been raised in a small portion. And today at lunch time I noticed that one meal became 20 cent more expensive.”
What does he think about the prices in Finland and his home country? Where are they higher?
”For me it is rather hard to answer this question as I come from Venezuela, a Latin American country in which it is much cheaper to live than here if you get there with foreign currency. So, I would rather not to compare the prices of food in Venezuela and Finland.”
When he buys food, he prefers such shops as Lidl and Minimani.
”Mainly, I buy food in Lidl which prices are quite affordable for students. However, there are several stuff such as milk, chicken and onion, which I would rather get from Minimani. The prices are much cheaper, and there is more option in this shop. Of course, the differences are quite small, let’s say, about 15-20 cent, but by from one to one, ten is approached, and at the end of the months if I check my bank account statement, those small purchases overcome a hundred.”

Text: Roman Kushnir

Picture: Janina Jouppi

 

Tietoa kirjoittajasta

Julkaistuja artikkeleita : 137

Jätä kommentti


+ 5 = seitsemän

© 2013

Scroll to top